banner banner banner banner banner banner banner banner banner banner banner banner banner banner
Infinite Menus, Copyright 2006, OpenCube Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Politics
Subscribe To This Feed

Hillary Clinton Email: Local Democratic Leaders Stirred, Not Shaken

Photo by Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Democratic leaders in the key early caucus state of Iowa and elsewhere are offering mixed reactions to revelations surrounding Hillary Clinton’s use of private email as secretary of state, with most standing by her but some questioning whether their party needs another choice.

"Those supportive of Hillary Clinton that were backing her in 2008 are pushing this aside," Linda Nelson, the Pottawattamie County, Iowa, Democratic chair, told ABC News. "Others are saying, 'Hey, Hillary is going to continue to have baggage from her husband's administration, from the State Department that’s going to be drawn out again and again, and we aren’t going to win the presidency. Let’s just get a fresh face and move forward.’”

Walt Pregler, Democratic Party chair for Dubuque County, Iowa, called the email issue "trivial," and other local Democratic leaders seemed to feel the same way.

“Everybody has a private email account. The fact that she has one doesn’t seem to make a big difference," Polk County Democratic Chair Tom Henderson told ABC News. "I don’t think voters know why it’s important yet."

Martin Peterson from Crawford County, Iowa, expressed concerns over a lack of options.

"Unfortunately there are no other candidates- I wish there were," Peterson said to ABC News. "It won’t be competitive enough and we’ll probably lose because I don’t think it will play out well for us. Now how about that for pessimism?"

Clinton’s team has said it has handed over 55,000 pages of emails to the State Department for review, and while the question of whether or not she broke any rules by purposefully avoiding a government-run email account is still up in the air, the optics of the controversy are the bigger issue, for some.

“She had the right to use it. But was it smart? Probably not,” Cedar County, Iowa, Democratic Party chair Larry Hodgden said. “It’s not illegal but this is just one more thing she’s opened herself up to controversy.”

Outside Iowa, other Democrats see the email controversy just as part of the inevitable political process.

Doug Grant, Democratic Party chair for the northern part of Grafton County, New Hampshire, called the email issue "a tempest in a teapot."

"I will look for a blazing star [candidate] that will come out from nowhere in the next three months, that will blaze in the sky. That’s just not too plausible, unfortunately," he said.

Pennsylvania Democratic Party Chairman Jim Burn told ABC News that he has "no pause" about Clinton, but a primary is necessary "if you have candidates who haven’t been battle-tested...but we’ve had that conversation with Hillary Clinton and we have pretty much vetted her."

One of the most vocal Democratic voices speaking out against Clinton is Dick Harpootlian, one of Vice President Joe Biden's biggest supporters and a former Democratic Party chairman in South Carolina.

"The chatter down here is, 'Is this the best we can do?'" Harpootlian told The Washington Post on Wednesday. "Certainly everyone wants to give a woman a chance to lead this country, but is [Clinton] the woman? There are plenty of other women who would be competitive, whether it’s Elizabeth Warren or Amy Klobuchar or Kirsten Gillibrand."

Harpootlian continued his criticisms Thursday on CNN, saying that the assumption that Clinton is the front-runner may save her from having to answer questions during the primary.

“Is that what we really want in a presidential candidate and is that really what we want in a president?” Harpootlian asked.

"Is she going to lose over the email account? Absolutley not. What I'm saying is this is symptomatic of a larger problem," he said.

“She’s got to run the campaign,” Harpootlian said. “I was around Clinton in '92. I was with Obama here in Virginia in '08. I’ll tell you who ran those campaigns: Bill Clinton and Barack Obama. Who the hell’s running this campaign?”

National Republican figures have suggested Clinton’s conduct regarding the emails will be a campaign issue.

"Hillary Clinton must think we’re all suckers," Republican National Committee spokesman Michael Short said in a statement released Wednesday evening. "The fact Hillary Clinton set up a 'homebrewed' email system in her house to skirt federal recordkeeping regulations is a pretty good indicator of just how transparent she’s interested in being."

Jeb Bush, one of Clinton’s likely opponents, tweeted a slight at Clinton as soon as the news of her private email domain and servers broke on Monday.

 

Transparency matters. Unclassified @HillaryClinton emails should be released. You can see mine, here. http://t.co/wZbtwd8O2j

— Jeb Bush (@JebBush) March 3, 2015

 

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Hillary Clinton Violated State Department Policy For Nearly Six Years, Official Says

Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Hillary Clinton was in violation of State Department rules governing the use of non-governmental email accounts during her entire tenure as secretary of state, ABC News has learned.

A senior State Department official tells ABC News that under rules in place while Mrs. Clinton was secretary of state, employees could only use private email accounts for official business if they turn those emails over to be entered into government computers. This policy is still in place.  

Until the private emails are entered into government computers, the official says, an employee is in violation of the rules.

Mrs. Clinton used a private email account for her entire tenure as secretary – and did not even have a government-issued email.  Mrs. Clinton did turn over some 55,000 pages of emails to be entered into government computer systems late last year, nearly two years after she stepped down from the State Department.

If Mrs. Clinton has now turned over all emails related to official business, she would be in compliance with State Department rules, an official said.  But there is no way to independently verify that she has done that.  

Mrs. Clinton’s spokesman says she has turned over about 90 percent of the emails she wrote as secretary of state, withholding only those that were strictly personal and not covered by the policy.

State Department email rules became an issue while Mrs. Clinton was secretary of state.

One of Mrs. Clinton’s ambassadors was criticized by the Department’s inspector general in a 2012 report for using private email.

“It is the Department’s general policy that normal day-to-day operations be conducted on an authorized information system, which has the proper level of security controls,” the Office of Inspector General wrote in the 2012 report.

The IG report warns that the use of non-governmental email accounts “increases the risk” of security breaches and the “loss of official public records as these systems do not have approved record preservation or backup functions.”

Clinton established her own private email network based out of her Chappaqua, New York, home, where aides say she has personally preserved all messages before turning them over.

Mrs. Clinton tweeted late Wednesday that she has asked the State Department to publicly release all the emails she turned over, but has otherwise remained silent on the controversy.

Back when she was last ran for president, Mrs. Clinton was quite vocal about other government officials who use private emails which circumvent automatic government archiving.  

“Our Constitution is being shredded. We know about the secret wiretaps, the secret military tribunals, the secret White House email accounts,” she said at an event in 2007, indirectly indicting the Republican administration. “It’s a stunning record of secrecy and corruption, of cronyism run amok.”

At least one Democrat -- a supporter of Vice President Biden -- lashed out at Mrs. Clinton's email practices in an interview on CNN.

“Is that what we really want in a presidential candidate?” former South Carolina Democratic Chairman Dick Harpootlian said in an interview with Jake Tapper on CNN.  “Who the hell’s running this campaign?”


Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Rick Perry Condemns Iran Negotiations in New Online Video

Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Rick Perry’s PAC released a new online video on Thursday in which he criticizes, point-by-point, the nuclear deal the United States is seeking with Iran.

At the end of the video, which was first reported by The Weekly Standard, Perry says the next president should not be bound by any agreement President Obama signs if Congress doesn’t support it.

“An arms control agreement that excludes our Congress, damages our security, and endangers our allies has to be reconsidered by any future president. We must not allow the incompetence of one administration to damage our country’s security for years and decades to come,” Perry said.

The video places Perry in front of all the other 2016 potential candidates on the issue, shortly after Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s speech to Congress and the AIPAC conference.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Washington, DC Residents Defy Sledding Ban on Capitol Grounds

hroe/iStock Editorial/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Heavy snow blanketed Capitol Hill on Thursday, producing a widespread urge to sled down Washington’s most iconic slopes.

The only problem? Sledding is banned on Capitol Grounds, dumbfounding many of DC’s residents.

“You're saying we can't sled on Capitol Hill?” one resident said in disbelief. “God.”

Nevertheless, dozens of DC residents and their children defied the ban, facing off against Capitol Police officers tasked with enforcement.

“Capitol regulations as stated are that there is no sledding or skiing on Capitol grounds for life safety and property damage issues,” USCP Lt. Eric Graves told people who had gathered to sled on a bunny hill on the West Front of the Capitol. “The main point being that there are sprinkler heads and stuff buried in the ground and we're seriously concerned about people coming to an abrupt stop or causing the sleds to flip over. That's why we ask people not to sled on Capitol grounds.”

But Graves’ warning didn’t deter anybody from a little fun.

“I understand your regulations, but we're going to do a little more sledding here,” one man told Graves, turning away to resume playing with his kids.

Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-DC, pleaded with the Capitol Police board to lift the ban through the snowy weekend, but her request was quickly denied Wednesday night.

Many of DC’s residents don’t understand the justification.

“What is the threat of letting a 10-year-old and a seven-year-old sled down Capitol Hill?” one woman asked incredulously.

Capitol Hill resident Ellen Adams brought her twin daughters Charlotte and Kendall, and hopes that beyond a day in the snow, they’ll take an important lesson home.

“It's ridiculous, I mean, it's such a great hill. It's just such a fun activity for the kids here on Capitol Hill,” Adams said. “I'm trying to teach them about civil disobedience.”

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Hillary Clinton Email Mystery Man: What We Know About Eric Hoteham

Scott Olson/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- One of the biggest mysteries surrounding the discovery that Hillary Clinton used a personal email account and private server during her time as secretary of State was the fact that the system was registered to a man who no one had ever heard of.

Who was Eric Hoteham? And why did have at least three different email domains -- clintonemail.com, wjcoffice.com and presidentclinton.com -- registered in his name even though the domains apparently were based in the former first couple’s home in suburban New York?

Efforts to locate public records related to anyone named Eric Hoteham were unsuccessful, in a search that included donor records, birth records or property records.

There is, however, an Eric Hothem who is named as a Clinton aide in a Washington Post article from 2001. At the time, he reportedly dismissed concerns from the White House chief usher who believed that, when leaving the White House at the end of President Bill Clinton's second term, the couple took pieces of furniture that should have remained in the White House.

Hothem was also mentioned in a House Government Reform Committee Report from 2002. In the report, he was identified as "an aide to first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton" who sent a wire transfer of $15,000 to Roger Clinton, Bill Clinton's brother.

Hothem's lawyer deferred to the first couple's lawyer, David Kendall, who said that the account for which Hothem was the custodian was the personal Citibank account of the former president and his wife, then a U.S. senator. Kendall said the money was a loan to Roger Clinton to help him obtain legal counsel for the committee's investigation.

On top of that, Hothem is thanked in Hillary Clinton’s 2003 memoir, Living History.

Hothem’s connection to the Clintons appears to drop off the public record shortly after the Clintons' time in the White House ended.

But right around that time, in October 2002, a man named Eric Hothem began working at Citigroup, according to financial records database BrightScope. He moved to JP Morgan in May 2013.

Hothem did not answer requests for comment Wednesday and JP Morgan had “no comment” when asked about the story.

Although ABC News has not been able to definitively link them, The New York Times reported that the current JP Morgan employee is the same man as Hillary Clinton's former aide.

One difficulty connecting the man who registered the Clinton domain names to the former first lady’s aide stemmed from the differences in the spelling of the names.

However, according to Jonathan Mayer, a computer science expert at Stanford University, there are often contradictions or typographical errors in server records, so it could be a spelling error.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Prosecutors Challenge Colorado Recreational Marijuana Law

iStock/Thinkstock(DENVER) -- County sheriffs and prosecutors from three states launched a court challenge Thursday against Colorado’s legalized marijuana, claiming that huge amounts of weed crossing state lines is placing an “undue burden” on the resources of small departments.

Colorado voters passed Amendment 64 legalizing recreational marijuana in November 2012. Retail stores began selling weed on Jan. 1, 2014, but marijuana is still considered illegal by the federal government.

"Amendment 64 is preempted by federal law and therefore violates the Supremacy Clause (Article VI) of the United States Constitution,” according to the lawsuit, filed Thursday in federal court.

The plaintiffs -- six Colorado sheriffs, four Nebraska sheriffs along with two county attorneys from Nebraska and Kansas -- want the relevant sections of the Colorado constitution declared “invalid, null, and void.”

Speaking at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. Thursday, Sheriff Mark Overman of Scott’s Bluff County, Nebraska says Colorado’s marijuana is a burden on taxpayers in his jurisdiction.

“Colorado’s legalization of marijuana has completely changed the landscape involving the marijuana that we encounter,” he said. “Because of Amendment 64, our jails are full, our court dockets are full. There are increased costs for overtime, for incarceration.”

Overman also claims his deputies are busting more kids for pot.

“We are seeing a marked increase in the numbers of children as young as 13 that we are finding in possession of marijuana. We don’t want what Colorado has," he said.

Larimer County Colorado Sheriff Justin Smith also said legalized marijuana in his state has created a “constitutional showdown” for law enforcement.

“In Colorado every elected official, sheriffs included, are required under the state constitution to take an oath of office,” Smith said. “And that oath of office requires that they swear to defend the Constitution of the United States and the state of Colorado. Amendment 64 puts a conflict in those two parts of the oath of office.”

The Justice Department has said it will not take legal action against states that have approved recreational marijuana use.

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper is named as the defendant in the lawsuit filed Thursday.

Hickenlooper has not been formally served with the lawsuit, said his spokeswoman Kathy Green.

However, Green told ABC News, “We will continue to defend the will of the voters while prioritizing public safety.”

Marijuana advocates say the lawsuit is frivolous.

"These guys need to get over it,” said Mason Tyvert with the Marijuana Policy Project.

"These law enforcement officers are trying to force marijuana cultivation and sales back into the underground market. Colorado adopted these laws in order to start controlling marijuana, and it's working,” Tyvert told ABC News.

Recreational marijuana is now legal in Alaska, Colorado, Washington state and Washington, D.C.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Top Congressional Leaders Urge Obama to Extend ‘Lethal’ Aid to Ukraine

Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- House Speaker John Boehner and a bipartisan group of senior congressional leaders want President Obama to beef up Ukraine's military, including the transfer of lethal defensive weapons systems, urging the president to utilize powers given to him by Congress late last year that he has not yet exercised but they believe will help fend off Russian aggression.

“In the wake of a cease-fire agreement that appears only to have consolidated Russian and separatist gains since the first Minsk agreement, we urge you to quickly approve additional efforts to support Ukraine’s efforts to defend its sovereign territory, including through the transfer of lethal, defensive weapons systems to the Ukrainian military,” a letter sent by the group of lawmakers on Thursday reads.

Obama signed the Ukraine Freedom Support Act on Dec. 18, but noted in a statement that day that “the administration does not intend to impose sanctions under this law, but the act gives the administration additional authorities that could be utilized, if circumstances warranted.”

Now, Congress wants Obama to reconsider after his administration has been hesitant to provide military aid.

“Congress has already, with overwhelming bipartisan support, provided you with the authorities, resources, and political support to provide assistance, including lethal, to the government and people of Ukraine,” notes the letter, signed by eight Republicans and three Democrats. “We urge you in the strongest possible terms to use those authorities and resources to meet the specific and direct requests the government of Ukraine has made of your administration.”

Last week, Boehner and a bipartisan group of lawmakers met at the Capitol with Ukrainian lawmakers, including Andriy Parubiy, first vice-speaker of the Verkohona Rada, also known as the Supreme Council of Ukraine. The speaker's office said the group "had a productive discussion about their shared goals of peace, freedom, and security." The letter on Thursday is the first visible effort to follow up on that meeting.

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko addressed a joint meeting of the United States Congress last September, urging lawmakers to stand with Ukraine.

The letter is signed by Boehner; House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif.; House Appropriations Committee Chairman Hal Rogers, R-Ky.; House Armed Services Committee Chairman Mac Thornberry, R-Texas; Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Ed Royce, R-Calif.; House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes, R-Calif.; Defense Appropriations Subcommittee Chairman Rodney Frelinghuysen, R-N.J.; State and Foreign Operations Appropriations Subcommittee Chairwoman Kay Granger, R-Texas; Rep. Eliot Engel, D-N.Y., ranking member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee; Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., ranking member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence; and Rep. Adam Smith, D-Wash., ranking member of the House Armed Services Committee.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

What Hillary Clinton Said About Email in 2000

Peter Paul(WASHINGTON) -- Hillary Clinton didn't like using email in 2000, and in light of the recent questions being raised over her personal email account, she may not now either.

Footage from a 2001 report by ABC News' Brian Ross about a disgruntled donor shows then-Sen. Clinton talking about how she had chosen to avoid email for fear of a paper trail.

"As much as I’ve been investigated and all of that, you know, why would I -- I don’t even want -- why would I ever want to do e-mail?" she's seen on tape telling Peter Paul on home video captured at a fundraiser.

"Can you imagine?" she said.

Times changed and Clinton used email throughout her tenure as secretary of state, but questions that are being asked now stem from her decision not to use a government-backed email service.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Rep. Chris Van Hollen Declares Candidacy for US Senate

US Congress(WASHINGTON) -- Rep. Chris Van Hollen, one of the Democrats’ brightest stars in the House of Representatives, has decided to make a run to fill the Senate seat of retiring Sen. Barbara Mikulski.

“I am excited to share that I have decided to run for the United States Senate from our great State of Maryland,” Van Hollen writes in a statement posted on his Facebook page Wednesday. “I am very much looking forward to the upcoming campaign and a healthy exchange of ideas.”

Van Hollen, 56, was widely seen as a possible replacement to House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi, once she steps down as leader of the caucus.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Hillary Clinton Responds to Email Controversy

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Hillary Clinton addressed concerns Wednesday about her use of a personal email account during her term as secretary of state, expressing a desire to release her emails. But a State Department spokesperson told ABC News it will be "several months" before the emails are released, because the department will need time to review the emails and remove sensitive and personal information.

“I want the public to see my email. I asked State to release them. They said they will review them for release as soon as possible,” Clinton wrote on Twitter.

I want the public to see my email. I asked State to release them. They said they will review them for release as soon as possible.

— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) March 5, 2015

State Department Deputy Spokesperson Marie Harf, in a statement that followed Clinton's tweet, said the department is focused on reviewing Clinton's emails.

"The State Department will review for public release the emails provided by Secretary Clinton to the Department, using a normal process that guides such releases. We will undertake this review as quickly as possible; given the sheer volume of the document set, this review will take some time to complete," the statement reads.

Clinton’s team submitted 55,000 pages of emails to the State Department -- but an unknown number of emails that do not pertain to work will not be turned over, a Clinton aide told ABC News.

The storage of Clinton’s emails has come under scrutiny after a New York Times report revealed that she used a personal, non-governmental email address to conduct official business as secretary of state.

Clinton used only one email address during her tenure, her attorney David Kendall wrote in an email to the House Select Committee, which is tasked with investigating the attack on the American consulate in Benghazi. The committee sent subpoenas to the State Department Wednesday requesting all of Clinton's communications related to Libya.

“The Select Committee on Benghazi today issued subpoenas for all communications of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton related to Libya and to the State Department for other individuals who have information pertinent to the investigation,” Jamal Ware, communications director for the committee, wrote in a statement. “The Committee also has issued preservation letters to internet firms informing them of their legal obligation to protect all relevant documents.”

The email account that Clinton used while working at the State Department was hdr22@clintonemail.com and was traced to a server based out of Chappaqua, where she and former President Bill Clinton have a home, ABC News confirmed.

ABC News also learned that another email domain, wjcoffice.com, which used the former president's initials as their descriptor, was also based out of Chappaqua. That domain was registered by an individual called Eric Hoteham, the same name used to register the clintonemail.com domain.

Clinton has yet to explain why she used her own server and personal email, instead of a State Department email address to comply with federal record-keeping requirements.


Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Senate Fails to Override Keystone Veto

Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- The U.S. Senate could not muster up enough votes Wednesday to put the Keystone XL pipeline back in play.

The bill on reconsideration failed to pass with a vote of 62 to 57, with eight Senate Democrats voting in favor of overriding the presidential veto.

The vote required support of two-thirds of the Senate to pass.

The legislation would have authorized construction of an $8 billion pipeline to transport oil from Canada to the Gulf Coast.  

President Obama said the State Department is still conducting its review of whether the pipeline is in the national interest.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Defense Sec. Carter, Gen. Dempsey Update Congress on ISIS, Sequestration Cuts

DoD photo by U.S. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Sean Hurt (WASHINGTON) -- During a second day of Department of Defense budget hearings, Defense Secretary Ash Carter and Gen. Martin Dempsey took questions on the situation in Iraq and Iran’s role in the Tikrit offensive.

Both said on Wednesday they want to ensure that Iraq’s government gets the message that there can’t be a return to the sectarianism that led to ISIS’s resurgence.   

“Sectarianism is one of the things that concerns me very much,” said Carter.  “And of course, it's the root of the Iranian presence in Iraq.” Carter said the hope is that an inclusive Iraqi government will promote stability and “the fastest route to the defeat of ISIL.”  

House Appropriations Defense Subcommittee Chairman Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen, R-NJ, sounded skeptical, cautioning, “Hope is not a plan.”

With regards to the AUMF, Carter explained that its three-year duration is due to the political cycle and was not a military requirement.

“I think it has to do with the political calendar in our country,” said Carter.  “I wouldn't assure anyone that this will be over in three years or that the campaign will be completed in three years. The three years comes from the fact that there'll be a presidential election in two years and so forth, and I respect that. That's not a military or a defense consideration, but I respect it as a constitutional consideration.”

Both Carter and Dempsey repeated the line that they’ll recommend potential changes to the ISIS strategy if it’s needed down the road, which could include the addition of U.S. ground troops.   

“If the commander on the ground approaches either me or the secretary of defense and believes that the introduction of special operations forces to accompany Iraqis or the new Syrian forces, or JTACS, these skilled folks who can call in close air support, if we believe that's necessary to achieve our objectives, we will make that recommendation,” Dempsey said.  

Dempsey added those possibilities are allowed by the AUMF request.

When contacted for comment on if the U.S. might someday consider sending some U.S. troops to Syria, his spokesman said Dempsey was speaking about a hypothetical and that “there is no consideration of sending U.S. troops into Syria beyond personnel recovery/combat rescue forces if necessary as the air campaign continues. ”

Dempsey noted the presence of Iranians in the Tikrit offensive and that it’s being watched carefully. He said Sunni politicians in Baghdad and Tikrit support the offensive because it’s targeting ISIS, but “if this becomes an excuse to ethnic cleanse then our campaign has a problem and we’re going to have to adjust our campaign.”

Since it was a budget hearing, Carter urged Congress to prevent another round of mandated sequestration cuts that would kick in later this year.   If the cuts continue over the next few years he warned they would change the size and shape of the military but would also significantly affect the ability to carry out the national defense strategy.

“We cannot meet sequester with further half-measures,” said Carter.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Congressional Black Caucus Works to Find Positive Aspects of AG's Ferguson Report

RedTackArts/iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Members of the Congressional Black Caucus decried the Department of Justice’s decision not to charge Darren Wilson with a crime related to the death of Michael Brown last summer in Ferguson, Missouri, but praised the overall assessment of the Attorney General’s report, which found a pattern and practice of discriminatory policing.

“The far-reaching report announced today represents an important path forward towards achieving equal justice under the law in Ferguson, Missouri and repairing some of the deep divisions and very real disparity in local law enforcement, which that community has endured for far too long,” Rep. G.K. Butterfield, D-N.C., the chairman of the CBC, said during a news conference Wednesday afternoon.

Rep. William Lacy Clay, the Democratic congressman who represents Ferguson, also tried to highlight the positive aspects of the report, but added his disappointment over the DOJ’s decision not to charge Wilson.

“While I’m extremely disappointed that Mike Brown’s killer will not face criminal charges, his death has forced our nation to begin a long-overdue conversation on race and the disparities it continues to perpetuate for too many Americans,” Clay, D-Missouri, said.

“We know that there was a miscarriage of justice at the local level on the part of the St. Louis County prosecutor,” Clay added. “The way the case was presented to the grand jury, the fault of the grand jury system. All of that came into play in this case, and it’s unfortunate.”

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Privacy Trumps Security in Clinton’s Choice to Use Personal Email Server, Expert Says

Photo by Feng Li/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- The storage of Hillary Clinton's emails while she was in office has come under scrutiny since it was revealed that she used a personal, non-governmental email address to conduct official business as secretary of state, but a tech expert says the biggest benefit of using a personal server to store an individual email domain is "complete control" over what can be stored and deleted.

"Basically you can decide what gets preserved and what doesn’t," information technology consultant Bruce Webster told ABC News. "You have direct immediate monitoring what’s going on and part of it is just you don’t want anyone else looking at what’s been deleted and where and what’s coming in."

Clinton is not the only likely 2016 presidential candidate who purposefully used a private server to host their government emails.

ABC News can confirm that Jeb Bush used a personal server while he was governor of Florida. According to an aide, it was housed in the governor’s office.

"Governor Bush’s office complied with public records laws throughout his administration and beyond," spokesperson Kristy Campbell told ABC News. "His emails have been available via public records requests to the state following his time as Governor and a set resides with the Florida Department of State for historic and archival value."

In theory, there is no way of knowing whether every email that was originally on a personal server has been transferred over to a different server because personal servers can be wiped clean without any secondary trace of a message. But, in the case of Bush he released those emails not only to the Florida Department of State, but also to the public earlier this year. Florida has expansive open records laws and this release is required. ABC News was able to obtain copies of his emails at the end of last year due to the state’s open records law.

With a private server, "Nothing is ever stored anywhere...no one else has any other copy of it," Webster told ABC News.

Webster said that having a personal server is an extreme and rare step that does not inherently make it more secure and people who take this step often hire someone to manage it.

"It’s the sort of thing hardcore computer geeks tend to do," Webster said.

On Wednesday Clinton’s attorney David Kendall sent an email to the House Select Committee tasked with investigating the attack on the American consulate in Benghazi, confirming that in spite of claims made by a Republican congressman, Clinton used only one email address during her tenure and the reason she changed it was because it was publicly released on a news site in 2013.

“Secretary Clinton used one email account when corresponding with anyone, from Department officials to friends to family,” Kendall said in his email.

The email account that Clinton used while working at the State Department, according to The AP, was hdr22@clintonemail.com, and was traced to a server based out of Chappaqua, where she and former President Bill Clinton have a home.

ABC News can confirm that another email domain, wjcoffice.com, which used the former president's initials as their descriptor, was also based out of Chappaqua.

Internet records obtained by ABC News show that second domain, wjcoffice.com, was registered by an individual called Eric Hoteham. The AP reports that the same name was used to register the clintonemail.com domain.

Efforts to locate public records related to anyone named Eric Hoteham, however, were unsuccessful, in a search that included donor records, birth records, or property records.

There is, however, an Eric Hothem who is named as a Clinton aide in a Washington Post article from 2001. At the time, he reportedly dismissed concerns from the White House chief usher who believed that, when leaving the White House at the end of Clinton's second term, the couple took pieces of furniture that should have remained in the White House. Hothem is also thanked in Clinton’s 2003 memoir Living History. An Eric Hothem who works at JPMorgan did not answer requests for comment Wednesday and JPMorgan had “no comment” when asked about the story.

On Wednesday evening, Clinton, along with her husband and their daughter Chelsea, will be celebrating at the Clinton Foundation’s annual gala in New York City. The musical guest is Carole King, and Neil Patrick Harris will also appear. Tickets range from $2,500 all the way up to $100,000 for “event chairs,” but it is closed to the press.


Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

House Select Committee on Benghazi Seeks All of Hillary Clinton’s Private Emails

Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- After news spread that Hillary Clinton relied exclusively on a personal email account while she served as secretary of state, the House Select Committee on Benghazi has sent subpoenas to the State Department Wednesday explicitly requesting all of her communications related to Libya.

“The Select Committee on Benghazi today (Wednesday) issued subpoenas for all communications of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton related to Libya and to the State Department for other individuals who have information pertinent to the investigation,” Jamal Ware, communications director for the committee, wrote in a statement. “The Committee also has issued preservation letters to internet firms informing them of their legal obligation to protect all relevant documents.”

The documents are the latest request from Rep. Trey Gowdy, the chairman of the committee, as his investigation into the deadly attack continues.

“You do not need a law degree to have an understanding of how troubling this is,” Gowdy told reporters. “There are chain of custody issues, there are preservation of materials and documents issues...there are best evidence issues, in addition to asking about archives and what safeguards may have been in place to protect this information."

While Gowdy stressed that Clinton had “more than one” private email account that she used during her tenure at the State Department, her lawyer wrote the committee today hoping to clear up any misconception.

“Secretary Clinton used one email account when corresponding with anyone, from Department officials to friends to family,” Clinton’s attorney David E. Kendall wrote in an email to the committee. "A month after she left the Department, Gawker published her email address and so she changed the address on her account. At the time, the emails were provided to the Department last year this new address appeared on the copies as the ‘sender,’ and not the address she used as Secretary. This address on the account did not exist until March 2103 [sic], after her tenure as Secretary.”

Nevertheless, Ware maintained that “the Select Committee on Benghazi is in possession of records with two separate and distinct email addresses used by former Secretary Clinton and dated during the time she was Secretary of State.”

"Without access to the relevant electronic information and stored data on the server -- which was reportedly registered to her home -- there is no way the Committee, or anyone else, can fully explain why the Committee uncovered two email addresses,” Ware said in a statement. “As Chairman Gowdy has noted, this is why former Secretary Clinton’s exclusive use of personal emails to conduct official U.S. government business is so problematic and raises significant issues for transparency. The American people have a right to a full accounting of all the former Secretary’s emails, and the Committee is committed to working to uncover all the facts.”

Gowdy said the committee discovered the existence of Clinton’s personal email accounts after obtaining documents late last summer that had not been previously produced to any committee investigating the deadly terrorist attack.

"The fact is the State Department cannot certify they have produced all of former Secretary Clinton’s emails because they do not have all of former Secretary Clinton’s emails, nor do they control access to them,” Gowdy said. “The State Department is relying on Secretary Clinton herself and her attorneys and advisors to tell us and to tell you what emails they think are to be preserved.”

Asked whether he still intends to call on Clinton to testify at the committee, Gowdy suggested the emails will lead to an invitation for the former secretary of state to sit down behind closed doors with committee investigators.

“This revelation, which we’ve known about which has now been made public, may well lay the groundwork for additional conversations with the secretary in some setting or another,” he said.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Center Weather
Center, TX
Fair 28°
  • 69% humidity
  • Winds at 3 mph
Full Forecast
Facebook

Warrant Roundup

Click the Image Below to see a list of Names and Fines

LinkedUpRadio Envisionwise Web Services